Conservation, augmented reality featured in Science and Tech Museum redesign

The NCC has approved plans for the facility's re-opening, three years after it first closed doors
Science and Tech Museum
Proposed and approved design for the revamped Science and Technology Museum.
Editor's Note

Correction: A previous version of this story referred to Alex Benay as the president and CEO of the Science and Technology Museum Corporation. At the time of publishing, Benay had moved on to his new role as chief information officer for the federal government, replaced in the interim by Fernand Proulx.

Three years after mould issues forced the Canadian Science and Technology Museum to close, the building is gearing up for a relaunch later this year with more than just a fresh coat of paint.

The National Capital Commission’s board of directors approved a master plan for the museum’s redesign, including a newly-renovated main building, an urban park and a space designated for preserving Canadian artifacts.

Also slated for the main museum property just off St. Laurent Boulevard, the Collection and Conservation Centre will be open to visitors and house more than two million artifacts, including pieces from the National Gallery of Canada and the Canadian Conservation Institute.

When the museum reopens on Nov. 17, 2017, the building will feature 80,000 sq ft of new exhibit space, including a 9,200 sq ft hall for temporary and travelling exhibitions.

The urban park element of the redesign, dubbed Science Park, is meant to act as an outdoor education space.

True to its name, new technologies will feature prominently at the Science and Tech Museum, including “Artifact Alley,” an augmented reality experience the museum says will allow it to better showcase its entire archive.

Five main exhibits will feature in the new museum, including “technology in our lives,” “creating and using knowledge,” “moving and connection,” “transforming resources,” and a children’s gallery.