City of Ottawa

Increase would see the average urban homeowner’s tax bill jump $119 to $4,086, while the average commercial property owner’s tax bill would rise $242 to $8,312.
Proposal would see owners of residential properties that are vacant more than 184 days a year pay a one per cent tax tacked onto their annual property tax bill.
Longtime city employee became a familiar face as he oversaw construction of the $2.1-billion Confederation Line.
The change would cut property taxes by 10 per cent at about 4,700 commercial properties housing nearly 8,000 small businesses in Ottawa.
New rules would translate into an annual discount of about $1,000 for a business property assessed at $600,000 that now pays about $15,000 a year in taxes.
Councillors gave a unanimous thumbs-up to the plan that would see pedestrian plazas set up along major streets and a “destination building” replace the Clarence Street parking garage.
Proposal calls for two buildings with a total of 139 apartment units and 10,000 square feet of commercial space in Kanata’s Beaverbrook neighbourhood.
The average commercial property owner will shell out an additional $231 under a draft budget framework approved by a city committee on Tuesday.
Proposed changes would make it easier and less expensive to have properties rezoned for certain types of businesses.
A vegetation-covered parcel of vacant land near the future Trim Road LRT station could become the site of mixed-use highrises soaring more than 30 storeys tall.