National Research Council marks 100th birthday

The quest for innovation may be a current theme, but it certainly isn’t a new one.

Take the National Research Council, for instance, which marked its 100th birthday Monday.

The NRC was a “modest committee of university and industry leaders intent on mobilizing science and technology in the national interest” when it formed on June 6, 1916, according to Tom Jenkins, Chairperson of the NRC Council.

“Today, the NRC is a world leader among research and technology organizations and that initial vision has paid off remarkably,” Mr. Jenkins said in a statement.

The NRC’s acting president, Maria Aubrey, said the council’s success has come from its ability to adapt to changing times.

“NRC has a proud history of accomplishments thanks to our past and present employees, and our many partners over the years,” Ms. Aubrey said in a statement. "We look forward to a new century of ground-breaking innovations."

Minister of Science Kristy Duncan said the NRC has become the “‘go-to’ research and technology organization in Canada” over the past 100 years.

"From its early days in military research to its contemporary research challenges like the future of renewable energy, the NRC has made, and will continue to make, a tangible difference in the lives of our citizens,” Ms. Duncan said in a statement.

To mark its birthday, the NRC is donating the first colour-standardized Canadian national flag to the Canada Science and Technology Museum. The NRC was tasked with creating a flag that maintains colour consistency through wear and tear 50 years ago.

"This flag is an integral piece of Canada's history,” the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation president and CEO Alex Benay said in a statement. “We are honoured that the National Research Council is offering it to the museum."

The flag will be on display when the science and tech museum reopens in the fall of 2017.