Ottawa's C-COM, Carleton University part of next-gen antenna project for 5G networks

Leslie Klein
C-COM chief executive Leslie Klein. File photo

An Ottawa-based satellite technology firm is joining an international consortium developing next-generation antennas for 5G cellular and satellite communications networks.

C-COM Satellite Systems said this week it’s one of several organizations taking part in a joint Canadian-European program to build “flexible and scalable” antennas that will help transmit data in 5G and high-frequency satellite bands. 

Other partners in the three-year project include Dutch firm NXP Semiconductors, which is leading the effort; Carleton University; Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands; Semiconductor Ideas to the Market BV, a Dutch IP provider; Skyworks Solutions Canada; and the University of Waterloo.

“We are pleased to be part of this ambitious and challenging project, which will lead to the development of the next generation 5G mmWave antenna technology for terrestrial as well as for high-frequency (V-band) satellite broadband communications,” C-COM chief executive Leslie Klein said in a statement.

The federal government’s Industrial Research Assistance Program is helping fund the project, which aims to boost wireless network capacity, speed up internet download speeds and reduce lag time as satellite signals are beamed between Earth and space.

C-COM develops, manufactures and deploys commercial satellite antenna technology that enables high-speed Internet, VoIP and video services. It’s particularly focused on remote areas, such as the far north in Canada and Russia as well as deserts in Australia and Saudi Arabia.

The company recently announced it will receive $1 million over the next two years from a federal agency to help fund the development of the next generation of its antenna technology.