BluMetric appoints Scott MacFabe as CEO of Ottawa cleantech firm

Nearly eight months after it announced longtime employee Roger Woeller was departing as CEO, Ottawa-based cleantech firm BluMetric has appointed a veteran industry executive as its new leader.

BluMetric (TSX-V:BLM) said Tuesday Scott MacFabe will take over as chief executive effective March 1. A graduate of the University of Waterloo, MacFabe brings more than three decades of experience as a hydrogeologist and senior leader in the cleantech industry.

“Taking the helm of BluMetric Environmental is both a privilege and a logical and exciting next step in my professional career,” MacFabe said in a statement.

“BluMetric is at an inflection point in its development. With my operational experience, U.S. contacts and broad range of environmental responsibilities with a wide variety of clients in many different sectors, I look forward to contributing to the efforts of BluMetric’s solid senior team to realize significant growth and expansion.”

Most recently, MacFabe was president and chief operating officer of the industrial and environmental division in the Chicago office of U.S.-based environmental engineering firm Kennedy/Jenks Consultants.

Before joining Kennedy/Jenks, he served as a top executive at wastewater consulting and engineering firm Malcolm Pirnie and later at ARCADIS, a Colorado-based company that acquired Malcolm Pirnie in 2009.

MacFabe assumes a role that has been temporarily filled by BluMetric senior vice-president of research and innovation Dan Scroggins, who replaced Woeller on an interim basis in December.

Woeller had an impressive record in his three years at the helm of BluMetric, which specializes in water and wastewater treatment.

He pulled the faltering company out of the doldrums after it posted seven consecutive years of losses – including nearly $7 million in fiscal 2014 alone – and led it to back-to-back annual profits. Under his guidance, the company landed several multimillion-dollar contracts with the federal government, primarily remediating contaminated water supplies in Canada’s north.

“My job was to get the wings level and get this thing pulling out of the dive, setting up conditions for growth for the future,” Woeller told OBJ last June when he announced he was stepping down.

Woeller said then the company was looking for someone with a different background to continue growing the company, adding his successor would need a solid understanding of the firm’s solutions as well as leadership and business acumen.

“The individual that’s hired has to understand our business, but they’ll bring another skillset to the table… this new CEO will have a different business background than I do,” he said.